FOR COD'S SAKE

What else is out there? 

If you haven't already it's time to try something new. There are sooo many more sustainable white fish out there than cod if that's all you want to eat. They have a great flavour and hold up just as well but are better for seafood stocks.

Ok you may have heard of Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall and the great fish fight...? If not, it's all for cod's sake. North sea cod is now off the red list and cod stocks are increasing but, simply put, if the demand for cod goes up it may mean price does too as it doesn't necessarily mean that the amount being caught rises as wellbut what are the alternatives? 


Today I'm going to share with you some of my fish recipes that don't use cod. First up is pollock with Thai style prawn fried rice. I know this choice of recipe will definitely surprise some people as I have never been a fan of fried rice buuut, this is different. I have found that take away or commercial fried rice is usually quite greasy tasting and I don't get that with this recipe at all.

I start mine of with my favourite trio of aromatics... chilli, garlic and ginger. I use a teaspoon of sesame oil for flavour and scramble in my egg and throw in some cooked prawns with some spring onion for freshness. I love using a long grain rice for this, make sure it's rinsed really well before cooking to remove some of the starch because that'll make your rice go claggy. Rinse through with cold water once cooked to help separate the grains then add to your egg mix to combine.

Onto the fish. I first tried pollock a few years ago when they were the only frozen white fillets left in at the supermarket and to be honest I've not looked back. It's cheaper than cod and has just as great a flavour so I always have a bag in the freezer.

I trim the fillet into portions then sprinkle with mixed herbs, salt, pepper and crushed chilli flakes and bake for 20mins. Serve it on top of your rice and you're good to go.

Another of my favourite recipes is a whole baked fillet of pollock. I top the fish with my homemade sunblush tomatoes and a crumb mix with a difference.

Topping the fillet with ground almonds rather than breadcrumbs is nutritionally better for you as they are higher in fibre and healthy fats, an easy switch for cholesterol watchers.

Mix the almonds with dried oregano and season to taste. Bake the whole thing at 180oc until the fish flakes apart easily and the crumb topping has some golden colour. 


Next up, fish tacos. I love love love Mexican food and have been given some great ideas of restaurants to try. Thanks guys : ) In the meantime though I am constantly trying to get it right at home too.

That's when I came up with these great tacos. Instead of cod, I used halibut for its meaty texture. Now, Pacific halibut is sustainable so where possible try and head for that over that from the Atlantic.

These tacos are a no brainer! I use a spice mix made up of flour, oregano, cumin, garlic, onion powder, cayenne pepper, chilli, salt and pepper to get an authentic flavour but then, and stick with me here, I add cornflakes. 

Hold up....WHAT??? Bear with me though while I explain. Cornflakes have an amazing flavour and texture that don't get soggy too quickly right? So why not use that for texture elsewhere? I just crunch them up and toss them in with the spice mix before baking. Don't knock it until you try it... honestly.


Lastly, prawns. I know it's seafood rather than fish but I do love seafood! For the most sustainable source you want to go organic buuuut, if you're not afraid to switch it up then jump on the langoustine bandwagon.

A spinach curry is one of my favourites and prawns hold spice so well so it seems like a match made in heaven right?? Well it is. My easy saag recipe is spiced without depending on heat from chilli. That being said, you can always ramp it up if you'd like to.

Hopefully I've given you some ideas of dishes to cook using more sustainable fish sources. Let me know what you try : )


*http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/environment/12150836/North-Sea-cod-could-be-sustainable-by-2017.html

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